Guidelines for writers

  1. Advocate is the mouthpiece of the South African Bar.
    It is a professional journal which provides information and guidance on developments in the profession and the administration of justice. Contributions on subjects which are of practical importance to members of the Bar are welcomed, and will receive priority.
  2. All manuscripts must be in MS Word or WordPerfect format, double-spaced throughout, including references and footnotes. An article should not exceed 3 000 words. Letters, notes and reports should generally not exceed 1 000 words. Shorter pieces, and clear, communicative writing, are preferred.

    Legal jargon derived from pleadings (e.g. ‘thereby’, ‘thereof’ etc) should be avoided.

    A contribution must preferably be sent by e-mail as an attachment to a message.
  3. Contributions and letters should be addressed to: The Editor, Advocate
    editor.advocate@mweb.co.za
    PO Box 786878, SANDTON 2146

    +27 (0)11 784 0175/0179/ (editor)
    +27 (0)11 784 0182/
  4. Material is considered for publication on the understanding that:
    • it has not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere;
    • the editorial committee and the editor have reserved the right to edit it as to style, length and language;
    • the writer has carefully checked quotations and references for accuracy;
    • it is written in clear, jargon-free language, and has linguistically been reviewed and checked for errors.
  5. The writer’s academic and professional qualifications, and also his or her occupation or professional status must be stated.
  6. Footnotes should, if possible, be avoided. Case references should preferably be incorporated into the text. When referring to a book the publisher and date of publication should be mentioned. In the case of articles the name of the writer, the title of the article and the date of publication should be indicated. Where footnotes are unavoidable, they should be numbered consecutively in superscript in the text, and reproduced on a new page at the end of the article. If there are only a few footnotes, asterisks may be used.

Further details on Advocate’s house style are available from the editor at the above address.

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Your book and glasses What the dickens! In the case of Palmer v Snow [1900] Dickens QC, with W Shakespeare, appeared for the respondent. The court considered the question whether a barber, the appellant, who shaved customers on a Sunday exercised 'worldly labour'. Messrs Dickens & Shakespeare, for the respondent, argued that a barber was a 'handy labourer'. The barrister for the appellant relied on authority that 'barbers craft ranked as a profession at least equal to that of doctors'. The court gave judgment for the appellant.